Cancer Genomics (CGx)

Patients with gene mutations have increased risk for hereditary cancer

Knowledge enables action:

  • Better understand their cancer risk
  • Help them take steps to lower their risk for getting BREAST, OVARIAN, PROSTATE, or OTHER CANCERS
  • Help them find it at an early stage when it's easier to treat

AMA policy encourages genetic testing under the guidance of a physician

CGx infographic: click here to view our CGx flyer.

Men & BRCA1 / BRCA2

33% of men with a BRCA1/2 mutation had a diagnosis of cancer.

Identifying individuals, including men, "at risk of carrying a BRCA1/2 mutation can be LIFESAVING and should be a part of routine medical care."

Excluding men at risk of BRCA-associated cancers is a missed opportunity.

Mutations in BRCA2 have been associated with approximately a 3 to 8.6-fold increase in the risk for prostate cancer in various studies. BRCA1 mutations increase risk by up to almost 4 fold.

Women & BRCA1 / BRCA2

50% of women who inherit a mutation will develop Breast Cancer by age 70.

2019 USPSTF Recommendation for Genetic Testing:

  1. Ancestry associated with BRCA1/2 mutations
  2. Women with prior cancers (Breast, Ovarian, Peritoneal and Fallopian Tube)

MD Labs, A Trusted Partner

Comprehensive Next Generation Sequencing Technology from AdvaGenix evaluates a panel of 138 inherited genes including BRCA1, BRCA2, Lynch Syndrome Genes, and other genes associated with an increased risk of leading cancers.

Interested? Let us know!

When is genetic testing for hereditary cancer indicated?

Per CMS, genetic testing is warranted when there are signs or symptoms of cancer:

  • Strong family history of certain types of cancer
  • Already diagnosed with cancer to determine if they are at a higher risk for other cancers
  • Family member of a person known to have an inherited gene mutation that increases cancer risk